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no, the 100 USD laptop does not cost 100 USD - it costs almost double this price. and yes, this wonderful thing, promoted by mr. negroponte to reduce education gaps in developing countries, does face serious criticism (ENG):

(...) In an interview with the BBC, Nigeria's education minister questioned the need for laptops in poorly equipped schools. Dr Igwe Aja-Nwachuku said: "What is the essence of introducing One Laptop per Child when they don't have seats to sit down and learn; when they don't have uniforms to go to school in, where they don't have facilities?" "We are more interested in laying a very solid foundation for quality education which will be efficient, effective, accessible and affordable." The previous government of Nigeria had committed to buying one million laptops (...)

as always, when technological innovation promises to change the world, one should look more closely at the social impact of such an intervention and into the social environment in which such an instrument is supposed to be embedded. a lot of promises, but is there any evaluation on what these computers are really able to change in an education system? I doubt if there is really any interest to go deeper into these issues. before complaining that the "charity one laptop per child" is being misunderstood, the learning outcomes of these laptops should be evaluated. or does this campaign aim at other than pedagocical issues and the millenium development goals are just misused to promote a product? here is the product:

 

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